Effective Meeting Request Tip Thank You Roundup

When I was interviewed about my podcasts, I got some really good advice from my friend Euvie at Timelapse Strategies. I had a difficult time booking my podcast interviews. It’s in my nature to be accommodating and flexible but sometimes I take it too far. In booking interviewees, I would usually leave my time very open ended with the usual invitation of “I’m very open. Let me know your schedule and I’ll work around you.”

I was very mistaken to think my interviewees would jump at such a flexible and time generous interview. On the contrary, this would lead to a lot of back-and-forth until I finally locked down a time. Euvie suggested I not be so open-ended and give very specific time windows. It sounds counter intuitive, but I finally applied this method at work.

I needed assistance from my vendor and emailed them to set up a meeting. I told him I had a morning meeting on Tuesday, but I’m pretty open for the rest of the week. Someone queue the crickets chirping. The next day I applied Euvie’s technique. I fired off a follow-up email and said from Wednesday through Friday I am available at 10 AM PST and 2 PM PST.  I concluded by saying I hope one of these times works for you. A few hours later, my vendor emails a meeting request with one of the times I suggested. Voila!

Final Thoughts

I thought flexibility and generosity trumps rigidity and scarcity. I have a lot to learn about business. Euvie theorized that by setting specific meeting times, you come off as more professional and most of the time the other party will take the meeting request more seriously. Most people would take a moment of their time to accommodate your request. Although originally suggested for booking podcast interviews, as you can see, it can be successfully applied in any work environment.

For more information, visit Timelapse Strategies today.

What makes your meeting requests more effective?

Stay Inspired!
Buck

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10 Responses

  1. krantcents says:

    Everyone does things for their own reasons! You have to figure out what motivates them and give them a reason to do it for themselves.

  2. Arlee Bird says:

    Maybe a lot of people prefer not to have to think too much and would rather be given a window to work with.

    Lee
    An A to Z Co-Host
    Tossing It Out

  3. I’m in sales and my job consists of scheduling follow up calls. I always try to lock a time down and being flexible hurts because it gives the impression that you are not busy enough.

  4. Most of the time, it works that way. You give them a specific time rather than you give them lot of options. If they are not available, they will usually just inform you so set for another schedule that will work for them.

  5. There are many reasons for why this works – and not just for business or booking interviews!

    On a basic human level, people don’t like having too many options – contrary to popular belief. This is why many high-end restaurants only have about 10 items on their menu, and expensive fashion boutiques only have a few things adorning their racks.

    There is a popular ice cream shop in Vancouver that has hundreds of flavours of ice cream on any given day, and charges a premium for this abundance of options. You know what their most purchased flavour is? That’s right, it’s vanilla.

    When faced with too many options, people tend to get overwhelmed and revert to what they already know, or not choose anything at all (like in the case with booking meetings).

    • Buck Inspire says:

      Thanks Euvie! Perhaps this is also a good reason to have focused goals. If you have too many options like in your examples, you’ll stick with status quo or do a whole lot of nothing. Were you a psych major? Thanks for the additional insight!

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